Epic Games and Administrative Access

I tend to be suspicious of applications that request administrative access to perform a function that I don’t think requires admin access. For the computers that my family use that I manage, I don’t give them administrative access. This has saved me from many headaches since it limits the amount of damage that can be done if they are a bit too trusting with items from the Internet; when they receive the admin prompt, they alert me and I can make a judgement on whether or not it is something that may be harmful.

The Epic Games application is another matter. Unlike Steam Games, which installs games in the user’s application folder, Epic Games installs games in the system Program Files folder. Every time there is an update to a game or an attempt to install another game an Administrative prompt is produced. This was particularly annoying when there were a few releases of Fortnite (or patches for it) over a relatively short period of time. I finally did something about these annoyances this weekend.

When the Epic Game installer is asking for administrative access, it is doing so because it is trying to access the Program Files folder. There are two ways to make these prompts unnecessary. But they both amount to the same thing; have the installer use a folder that the user has access to. For one method, you can simply have the installer use some alternative folder when it is originally installed. Make a folder somewhere on your drive, ensure that non-admin users have access to it, and have the installer work from there. The other method is to modify the permissions on the existing Epic game folder or sub-folder. Granting permission to user that plays the game no the Epic game folder will allow them to install anything from the Epic store without an Admin prompt. If you don’t want to grant the user this ability, but want them to be able to update existing games, then the permission can be granted on each sub-folder for each game instead.

To grant the permissions for the user to install any game, open the file Explorer to c:\Program Files\. Look for the Epic Games folder. If you right-click on the folder and select “properties” a window opens. Under the “Security” tab of this window you will see some users listed. Click on “Edit.” Then click on “Add.” Type the user name that will have permission to install games and click on Okay. When you click on the user’s name in the list, the permissions that the user has are listed. Check the boxes laveled “Modify”, “Read&Execute”, and “Write.” The user will now be able to install any Epic game.

If you only wanted the user to be able to update games that were already installed, you will see folders for each game inside of the Epic Games folder. Instead of performing the above procedure on the Epic Games folder, perform it on the subfolders for the specific games that you are targeting.


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