Bixby Studio Available for all Bixby Compatible Devices @SDC19

bixby

Samsung announced today at the annual Developer Conference that Bixby Studio, their developer tool for building natural language interactions, is available on all devices that support Bixby. Previously this functionality was only available on the mobile devices. With today’s announcement it is available on other devices such as the TV, Tizen powered refrigerators, and the watch.

To encourage developers to get started with Bixby development they’ve also opened a contest offering thousands of dollars in prizes. For more information on the contest visit BixbyDevJam.com.

Consumer v Commercial Displays

There are two mistakes that one might make about the difference in consumer and commercial displays.

Mistake 1: Commercial Display are just Consumer Displays that cost More

This is an easy mistake to make because at first glance the displays may look alike. But commercial displays are made to withstand a wider range of conditions than their consumer counterparts. An illustration of this that comes to my mine is a display I worked on that was installed in an airport. When the display opened to the public we saw some abuses that we didn’t quite imagine. The installation included touch screens. We expected people to touch the screens. We didn’t expect people to set their children on top of the displays. Yes, this really happened. The displays survived the years that they were at the installation without problems, but I still consider some of what they endured to be borderline abusive. If a small child were set on a consumer display (do not do this) I’m pretty sure that it wouldn’t last long.

That is just one of the tolerances that a commercial display may have that it’s consumer counter part does not. The commercial displays may also have higher tolerance for moisture (perhaps even outdoor use), temperature, potentially higher potentially a brighter screen (as might be needed for outdoor use).

Commercial displays may have a number of features that the consumer counter parts do not.  These may be additional connections (such as RS232), the ability to control several displays at once (as one might want to do in a video array configuration) and even internal media players or security features.

Mistake 2: A Commercial Display would make a good Home Display

This misconception comes from the idea that a commercial display is a consumer display with features added. The reality is that while the commercial displays may have additional features they might also be missing features that the consumer displays have. If you buy a typical consumer display above a certain size it will have the ability to run several consumer oriented applications such as a Netflix and Hulu player and a few others. The commercial displays don’t have this; and that is understandable since they are not for engaging in these consumer activities. A person that pays the extra money to get a commercial display may leave one feeling quite disappointed after realizing the features that are not available.

Samsung Consumer Displays v Samsung Commercial Displays

I’m looking at to displays that were made at about the same time. Both are made by Samsung; one is a consumer display and the other is a commercial display. Getting the differences between them has required my own exploration and experimentation. Samsung has a site at https://samsungDforum.com that contains information about the consumer displays. Unfortunately this information is only available to those that sign up for the Samsung Partner program. From what I’ve read about this program an NDA is required to enroll within it. I have not signed up for this program; if I did then I wouldn’t be able to talk about the information gained within it. As part of my interest in the displays is to talk about them (on this blog) I’m instead am gathering information both from experimenting with the display and through scraps of information available on the Internet.

The process of experimentation has had it’s moments of frustration, and I’ve already written some material on my experiences that are to be posted in the future.¬† In my next post on this topic I’ll talk about the differences in the Samsung Consumer and Commercial displays.

 

End of Linux on DeX Beta

Unfortunately, Samsung has recently announced the end of Linux on Dex support. The last time I mentioned LoD was when Samsung mentioned it was coming to more devices. A close associate recently acquired one of those devices to which support was coming. When I tried to get her sign up for the Beta I had found that there was no way to get her signed up. That was about two weeks before the Samsung announcement.

To summarize, Samsung stated what as one upgrades to Android 10 they would loose the Linux on DeX functionality; if someone wants to run a full Linux setup on their computer they will have to avoid upgrading. There was no statement on whether or not there will be anything to replace this functionality.

Personally I will miss this functionality. When I was finally able to access it I was able to leave my computer behind when I went on trips. While it wasn’t as fully ccapable as my laptop it supported enough functionality to be a secondary developerment solution; I could do enough things to respond to some unanticipated requests. I had access to GIT, Node, and various other development and command line tools include Visual Studio Code. Unless Google or Samsung plan to release a replacement this will be functionality lost with the next OS update.

In the mean time I’ll be looking back to the Chromebook. The Chromebook has some limited linux support that may be helpful. Though the last time I used it there was no where near as much functionality as LoD.

It will be missed. ūüė¶

Creating a new Tizen Project for Samsung TVs

The objective of this entry while basic covers an easy mistake to make. It is a mistake that I have made. I’ve got a new Samsung Series 6 TV and I tried to deploy a new project to it. Errors were encountered, frustration levels were raised, but eventually I encountered success.

The Samsung TVs are more locked down than some of the other Tizen devices that I’ve worked with. The more recent ones are more locked down than some of the previous ones. When things go wrong this is what you might see.




The TV I am using runs version 4 of the Tizen operating system. I make a new Tizen project and select to create the new project from the TV templates choosing Tizen 4 as the platform.

TizenNewProject

Attempts to debug the project created from this template fail. I get an error message stating:

Launching [your app name here] has encountered a problem
closed
   closed
     closed

The terminal output isn’t of much help.

Launching the Tizen application...
# If you want to see the detailed information,
# please set the logging level to DEBUG in Preferences and check the log file in 'C:\tizen-studio-data\ide\logs/ide-20191006_014055.log'.

[Initializing the launch environment...]
RDS: Off
Target information: UN43NU6900
Application information: Id(07DOxO8iKR.SystemInfo3), Package Name(07DOxO8iKR), Project Name([your app name here])
Unexpected stop progress...
(0.337 sec)

So what gives?  There are two ways to address this that are essentially two paths to the same destination. The manual solution involves editing a couple of configuration options in the files config.xml and .tproject.

The file .tproject is not visible in the Tizen IDE. But you can still open it through file -> open. This file is an XML file. There is an element named that has a sub-element . I changed the value here to tv-samsung-540. The other change in config.xml is on an element of the form . This needs to be changed to .

Why are these changes necessary? I don’t have full confirmation on this, but I believe it has to do with differences between a generic Tizen device and Samsung Tizen devices. At the time of this writing I know of no physical implementations of any non-Samsung TV Tizen devices. But it does exist as a specification.

The other solution would be performed at the creation of the project. When creating a new project do not select from the TV project templates. Instead select the Custom project templates. Within these templates there is a TV template subtype. If you choose this project type then you will start off with the configuration files mentioned above having the values that are needed.

As the Tizen operating system and the development environment are updated year to year more readers will read this entry after a new Tizen version has been released than before. It is likely that the exact values that you include here will be different than what I have used. You may need to update the values accordingly. But hopefully this will point you in the right direction.

Windows 10 IoT Core Installer Blocked?

If you try to install Windows 10 IoT core from the installer chances are you wil get blocked with the following error.

Your administrator has blocked this application because it potentially poses 
a security risk to your computer."  and "Your security settings do not allow 
this application to be installed on your computer.

I ran into this recently when preparing a Raspberry Pi to run Windows 10 IoT Core. What gives? Well, that is due to a Windows Security Setting. The setting can be changed by editing the registry.  The registry key can be found at the following location

Computer\HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\.NETFramework\Security\TrustManager\PromptingLevel

The keys inside of this path contain one key named Internet that is set to Disabled. Change it to Enabled. Then you should be able to perform the installation and then change the key back.

Raspberry Pi Starter Kit

Available on Amazon for free at the time of this writing

Getting Ready for the Holiday Season with Phillips Hue and a Raspberry Pi

The holiday season is upon us; by the end of this month I expect to start seeing my neighbors put out their fall decorations. By mid-October decorations for Halloween will show up. After Halloween the decorations roll back to fall themed only and then are changed to Christmas decorations right after new years. Two of these holidays tend to come with flashy displays and lights: Halloween and Christmas.

porch

I primarily use Phillips Hue lighting throughout my house and it is a perfect companion for festive displays. The color bulbs are adaptable to any color scheme and the newly released Edison-style bulbs add a warm glow to fall scenes.¬† The Phillips Hue lighting sets are programmable if you are using a hub. While the new light bulbs have Bluetooth support to directly be controlled by a phone there’s not public API for them (yet). For programming a hub is needed.

pumpkin

I’ve written on controlling the Phillips Hue lights before. Expanding on that I wanted to make a project that would let an IoT device trigger a scene according to some external event. I’ll use a motion sensor to trigger the relevant events.

 

But you could also use sound, change in temperature, lighting, or time as sources. I’ll be using a Raspberry Pi; it has network connectivity and can be easily interfaced to a number of devices.¬† I’m using the Raspberry Pi zero but about any Pi will do. Hue does have available a motion sensor ; if one only wishes to control lights based on motion a solution is available. But if one wishes to have other triggers or trigger other actions along with the lights a custom solution is needed.

20191005_160504.jpg

The Raspberry Pi 4 with a heat sink attached.

20191005_161532.jpg

Raspberry Pi Zero with a 4-port USB hub

All that I want to happen is for the the lighting pattern to change when a person is detected. I’ll use a passive infrared sensor for presence detection.¬† For Halloween I want a Hue light that is illuminating a jack-o-lantern to pulsate an orange color. When someone comes up knock on the door I want the light for the front door to go bright white. A few moments after a person is no longer there I want the system to go back to it’s previous pattern. But past a certain hour I don’t want this to continue; after 10:00pm the lights should extinguish. Simple enough, right?

 

20191005_155936.jpg

This is the passive infrared sensor that I used.

The physical build for this circuit is easy. The Passive Infrared Sensor (PIR) will get power from the VCC and ground pins of the Raspberry Pi. The signal line from the PIR can be connected to any of the GPIO pins. I’m going to use pin 3. The circuit will need to be put in an enclosure to protect it from rain or humidity in general. If your enclosure doesn’t already have a weather protected way to get power in your options are to either run the Pi off of a battery that is within the enclosure¬† (that means periodic recharging) or drill a hole for the wires yourself and apply a sealant.

There are a lot of languages that I could use for writing my program on the Pi. Python, Java, and C/C++ make the top of the list (in no specific order). For this project I’ve decided to go with Java. To interact with the pins in Java we will need to import classes from com.pi4j.io and com.pi4j.wiringpi. These are not standard libraries; they exists to provide an interface to the pins. To demonstrate reading a pin in Java here is a simple program that will print text in a look that reflects the pin state.

import com.pi4j.io.*;
import com.pi4j.wiringpi.Gpio;
import com.pi4j.wiringpi.GpioUtil;

public class PinTest {
   public static void main(String args[]) throws InterruptedException {   
      final GpioController gpio = GpioFactory.getInstance();
      Gpio.pinMode (3, Gpio.INPUT) ;          
      while(true) {
         if (Gpio.digitalRead(3) == 0){
               System.out.println(The Pin is ON");
         }else{
            System.out.println("The Pin is OFF");
         }
      }
   }
}

Phillips has an SDK for Java. You might see it present as an SDK for Android, but it works fine in other Java environments. A convenience from this is that a significant portion of the development can be done on your computer of choice. I did most of the development on a Mac and used git to transfer it to the Raspberry Pi when done.

20191005_162433.jpg

The color Hue lighting can take on a variety of colors.

The overall execution loop of the program will check whether or not the trigger condition has occurred. If the trigger condition has occurred then the program will activate a scene. If not then it deactivates the scene. The program loop also contains some debouncing logic. Depending on the type of sensor used and the sensors characteristics a sensor could change states with ever cycle. I’ve chosen to only deactivate if a certain amount of time has passed since the last activation. For initial development instead of interfacing to an actual sensor I have a method that is returning a random Boolean value. When the code is moved to the Raspberry Pi this method will be updated to read the state of the actual sensor. The following will only deactivate after there have been 2 seconds with no activation event.

    boolean getActivationState() { 
        return random.nextBoolean();
    }

    void runLoop() throws InterruptedException{ 
        System.out.println("running");
        long lastActivation = System.currentTimeMillis();
        while(true) { 
            Thread.sleep(100);
            boolean isActivated = getActivationState();
            if(isActivated) {
                lastActivation = System.currentTimeMillis();
                activateScene();
            }
            else {
                long now = System.currentTimeMillis();
                if ((now - lastActivation)> 2000)
                    deactivateScene();
            }
        }
    }

Controlling the lights happens through the Hue SDK. Before activating the lights the Hue bridge must be discovered. While Hue makes a series of lights that have Bluetooth controllers built in and can be controlled without the Hue Bridge currently they only support APIs through the bridge. It is a required hardware component.

The SDK already contains functions for discovering the bridge. All that a developer needs to do is initiate a search and implement a callback object that will receive information on the bridges discovered. In the following I instantiate the Phillips Hue SDK object and register a listener.  If the program had been connected with a bridge before the IP address if that bridge is loaded and it reconnects to it. Otherwise the search is initiated. As the search occurs the earlier registered listener receives callbacks.

private void init() {
    this.loadSettings();
    System.out.println("Getting SDK instance");
    phHueSDK = PHHueSDK.create();
    System.out.println("Setting App Name");
    phHueSDK.setAppName("HolidayLights");
    phHueSDK.setDeviceName("RaspPi");
    System.out.println("SDK initialized");
    phHueSDK.getNotificationManager().registerSDKListener(listener);

    if(this.getLastIpAddress()  != null) {
        System.out.println("Connect to last access point");
        PHAccessPoint lastAccessPoint = new PHAccessPoint();
        lastAccessPoint.setIpAddress(getLastIpAddress());
        lastAccessPoint.setUsername(getUserName());
        if (!phHueSDK.isAccessPointConnected(lastAccessPoint)) {
            phHueSDK.connect(lastAccessPoint);
        }
    } else {
        System.out.println("Searching for access point");
        PHBridgeSearchManager sm = (PHBridgeSearchManager) phHueSDK.getSDKService(PHHueSDK.SEARCH_BRIDGE);
        // Start the UPNP Searching of local bridges.
        sm.search(true, true);
    }
}

The listener is of type PHSDKListener. I won’t show the full implementation here but will show some of the more relevant parts.

When the bridges are found they are returned as a list. I’ve only got one on my home network and so I connect to the first one seen. If you have more than one bridge you’ll need to implement your own logic for making a selection.

@Override
public void onAccessPointsFound(List accessPoint) {
    System.out.println("Access point found");
    if (accessPoint != null && accessPoint.size() > 0) {
        System.out.println("Number of access points: "+new Integer(accessPoint.size()).toString());
        phHueSDK.getAccessPointsFound().clear();
        phHueSDK.getAccessPointsFound().addAll(accessPoint);      
        phHueSDK.connect(accessPoint.get(0));       
    }
}

When the connect attempt is made it is necessary to press the pairing button on the bridge. The console will print a message from the SDK saying this.  Once the bridge is connected I save an instance of the bridge and the a

 

 

        @Override
        public void onBridgeConnected(PHBridge b, String username) {
            HolidayController.this.bridge = b;
            isBridgeConnected = true;
            System.out.println("on bridge connected...");
            phHueSDK.setSelectedBridge(b);
            phHueSDK.enableHeartbeat(b, PHHueSDK.HB_INTERVAL);
            phHueSDK.getLastHeartbeat().put(b.getResourceCache().getBridgeConfiguration() .getIpAddress(), System.currentTimeMillis());
            setLastIpAddress(b.getResourceCache().getBridgeConfiguration().getIpAddress());
            setUserName(username);
        }

After the bridge connects the SDK will query the state of the lights on the system and update some objects representing the last known state of each light. The first time the cache is updated the program prints the name of each light and the light’s identity. This information is useful for selecting which lights will be controlled.¬† The light list is saved for the program to use.

        @Override
        public void onCacheUpdated(List<Integer> arg0, PHBridge bridge) {
            if(!isDeviceListPrinted) {
                PHBridgeResourcesCache rc = bridge.getResourceCache();
                List<PHLight> lightList = rc.getAllLights();
                HolidayController.this.lightList = lightList;
                ListIterator<PHLight> it = lightList.listIterator();
                while(it.hasNext()) {
                    PHLight l = it.next();
                    System.out.println(l.getIdentifier() + "    " + l.getName());
                }
                isDeviceListPrinted = true;
            }
        }
With that in place we now have enough information to change the state of the lights. To test things out I started with implementations of activateScene and deactivateScene that will just turn all the Hue lights on and off (don’t do this if you have other people in your dwelling that this would affect).
void activateScene() {
    ListIterator<PHLight> it = lightList.listIterator();
    while(it.hasNext()) {
        PHLight l = it.next();
        System.out.println(l.getIdentifier() + "    " + l.getName());
        PHLightState state = l.getLastKnownLightState();
        state.setOn(true);
        state.setBrightness(254);
        float[] xy = PHUtilities.calculateXYFromRGB(
            0xFF & ((int)color>> 0x10), 
            0xFF & ((int)color >> (long)0x08), 
            0xFF & (int)color, l.getModelNumber());
        l.setLastKnownLightState(state);
    
        bridge.updateLightState(l.getIdentifier(), state,  NOPListener);
    }
    isDeviceListPrinted = true;
}

void deactivateScene() {
    ListIterator<PHLight> it = lightList.listIterator();
    while(it.hasNext()) {
        PHLight l = it.next();
        System.out.println(l.getIdentifier() + "    " + l.getName());
        PHLightState state = l.getLastKnownLightState();
        state.setOn(false);
        //state.setBrightness(254);
        l.setLastKnownLightState(state);
    
        this.bridge.updateLightState(l.getIdentifier(), state,  NOPListener);
    }
    isDeviceListPrinted = true;
}
If the program is run at this point the lights will turn on and off somewhat randomly. Ultimately we don’t want it to control all the lights. Instead I want to be able to specify the lights that it is going to control. I’ve made a JSON file file that contains a couple of elements. One is the RGB color that I want to use in the form of an integer, the other is an array of numbers where each number is an ID for the light to be controlled. The RGB color is specified here as a base 10 number instead of the normal base 16 that you may see used for RGB codes. Unfortunately JSON doesn’t support hexadecimal numbers ūüôĀ.
{
    "lights":[5, 7, 9],
    "color": 16711935
}
These values are read by the code. Before the code acts on any light it checks to see if its identifier is in this array before continuing. During activation if the identifier is in the array the light’s state is set to on, brightness is set to full, and the color is applied. The color must be converted to the right color space before being applied to the light; something that is done with a utility function that the SDK provides.
void activateScene() {
    System.out.println("activating scene");
    ListIterator<PHLight> it = lightList.listIterator();
    while(it.hasNext()) {
        PHLight l = it.next();
        if(isTargetLight(l.getIdentifier())) {
            System.out.println(l.getIdentifier() + "    " + l.getName());
            PHLightState state = l.getLastKnownLightState();
            state.setOn(true);
            state.setBrightness(254);
            float[] xy = PHUtilities.calculateXYFromRGB(
                0xFF & ((int)color>> 0x10), 
                0xFF & ((int)color >> (long)0x08), 
                0xFF & (int)color, l.getModelNumber()
            );
            state.setX(xy[0]);
            state.setY(xy[1]);
            l.setLastKnownLightState(state);        
            bridge.updateLightState(l.getIdentifier(), state,  NOPListener);
        }
    }
}

void deactivateScene() {
    System.out.println("deactivating");
    ListIterator<PHLight> it = lightList.listIterator();
    while(it.hasNext()) {
        PHLight l = it.next();
        if(isTargetLight(l.getIdentifier())) {
        System.out.println(l.getIdentifier() + "    " + l.getName());
        PHLightState state = l.getLastKnownLightState();
        state.setOn(false);
        l.setLastKnownLightState(state);
    
        this.bridge.updateLightState(l.getIdentifier(), state,  NOPListener);
        }
    }
}
The last steps needed to make the device work as intended are to update the getActivationState() function to read the actual state of the motion sensor instead of a random value and wiring the motion sensor to a Raspberry Pi. From hereon the code is only going to work on a Raspberry Pi since the libraries for reading the pins are only applicable to this device. It is possible to dynamically load class libraries and use them as needed for the specific platform on which code is running. But information on doing that is beyond the scope of what I wish to discuss here.
I’m declaring a GpioController variable at the class level and am instantiating it in the constructor. I also set the mode of the IO pin that I’ll be using to¬† input.
    GpioController gpio;
    
    HolidayController() {
        gpio = GpioFactory.getInstance();
        Gpio.pinMode (3, Gpio.INPUT) ; 
        //....
     }
The getActivationState() implementation only needs to contain a single line.
boolean getActivationState() { 
   return Gpio.digitalRead(3);
}
With that change it will now work. If the Raspberry Pi is placed in a position where the motion sensor has a view of the space of interest then it will control the lights. If you are using one of the earlier Raspberry Pis (anything before the Raspberry Pi 4) you should be able to also power the Pi off of a portable phone charger; there are many that will make sufficient batteries for the Pi. The Raspberry Pi 4 has higher energy requirements and you may run into more challenges finding a portable power supply that works.
Why use the Pi at all for this? Because there is a lot of room to expand. Such as using the video capabilities of the pi to power a display or controlling other devices. Controlling the lights is a start. I’ll be revisiting this project for add-ons in the future.
If you want to start on something similar yourself the following (affiliate) links will take you to the products on Amazon.
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